#BlackPanthersMatter

Tour curated by: Camille J. Brown

History has an eerie way of repeating itself. Rediscover the Black Panther Party with eyes on the #BlackLivesMatter movement.

Locations for Tour

In 2013 the Black Panther traffic light at Market and 55th streets was updated with a new pole, crosswalk buttons, and light fixtures. Uploading the change to Flickr from his smartphone, Eric Fischer asked “is it still actually ‘this…

From 1967-70, the arrest and trial of Huey P. Newton brought Black Panther Party members and allies to the Alameda County Courthouse steps in protest. Newton had been charged with murdering police officer John Frey in cold blood despite Newton’s…

Studies of social movements over the years have found that participants share common demographics: A majority are students in their 20s. Perhaps this is because college campuses are enabling spaces for assembly and protest. They grant students access…

In looking back on the 60s, Audre Lorde famously said, “There is no such thing as a single-issue struggle because we do not live single-issue lives.” This statement has since been cited ad infinitum by those preaching what scholars now call…

The third Black Panther Party headquarters building was shot up by police on September 10, 1968 just two days after J. Edgar Hoover declared the Party to be “the greatest threat to the internal security of the country.” This was not the first…

The Black Panther Party moved its Central Headquarters to Peralta Street in 1970. Leaders hoped that if their center blended in more demographically than previous locations then it would be harder for members to be followed and patrolled by police.…

On December 4, 1969, Black Panther leaders Fred Hampton and Mark Clark were gunned down by 14 police officers in their Chicago apartment. Police described the event as "a fierce gun battle" but ballistics later determined that only one…

When Black Panther leader and co-founder Huey P. Newton was gunned down by a gang member on August 22, 1989 his last words were allegedly “You can kill my body, and you can take my life but you can never kill my soul. My soul will live forever!”…

For the Black Panther Party, some political leveraging was necessary in order to achieve certain ends. In the case of Bill’s Liquors, that involved congressman Ronald V. Dellums drafting a settlement between the Party and African American store…

Panther Patrols (sometimes referred to as "Patrolling the Pigs") were perhaps the Black Panther Party's most famous and historically remembered tactic. Seeing the black ghetto as a police state, Panthers exercised their Second…